Welcome

What an exciting time we had at the launch of Dramawise Reimagined!

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It was the 40th anniversary of Drama Queensland with luminaries of the drama teaching community in abundance. Now we knew that the original Dramawise was one of the ‘bibles’ of drama teaching and although 30 years old there was an outcry when a couple of years ago this much loved text went out of print; what we were less aware of was the reason for its great popularity.

The central theme of the text is the exploration of the ’elements of drama’ building on the philosophy first outlined by Aristotle in his Poetics over 2000 years ago. The international best seller is back, bigger and better than ever. This revised edition brings the contents completely up to date with the new Arts Curriculum. We sold a remarkable number at the Drama Queensland Conference and it has been selling steadily ever since.

— ♠ ♣ ♥ ♦ —

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I have not had time yet to even skim through the latest batch of new releases (some have not arrived in store yet) We’ve listed the titles below but if you have questions about the content and suitability of plays which might catch your eye please contact us and we’ll take a look.

Welcome  

Thank you for your continued support!

We look forward to your orders and enquiries.

Mary Sutherland


Contents

Welcome

Teaching Resources

Australian Plays

World Plays

Book / Kit / DVD / Masks Jacket Images


Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

Brief Synopses

  • Stanislavsky in the World edited by Jonathan Pitches & Stefan Aquilina presents an international perspective on Stanislavsky's impact that has never been attempted before.
  • Dramawise Reimagined by Brad Haseman & Peter O’Toole is a new and updated edition that specifically addresses ‘The Elements of Drama’, the first component of essential knowledge for Drama in the Australian Curriculum: The Arts. Every drama teacher needs this book.
  • Transforming Schools Creativity, Critical Reflection, Communication, Collaboration by Miranda Jefferson & Michael Anderson demonstrates how a renewed approach to teaching that integrates the 4Cs can better equip today's learners.

Publication due May 2017

Stanislavski in the World
The System and the Transformations Across Continents

edited by Jonathan Pitches & Stefan Aquilina

 

Stanislavsky in the World is an ambitious and ground-breaking work charting a fascinating story of the global dissemination and transformation of Stanislavsky's practices.

Case studies written by local experts, historians and practitioners are brought together to introduce the reader to new routes of Stanislavskian transmission across the continents of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia and South (Latin) America. Such a diverse set of stories moves radically beyond linear understandings of transmission to embrace questions of transformation, translation, hybridisation, appropriation and resistance.

This important work not only makes a significant contribution to Stanislavsky studies but also to recent research on theatre and interculturalism, theatre and globalisation, theatre and (post)colonialism and to the wider critical turn in performer training historiographies.

This is a unique examination of Stanislavsky's work presenting a richly diverse range of examples and an international perspective on Stanislavsky's impact that has never been attempted before.


Published March 2017

Dramawise Reimagined
Learning to Manage the Elements of Drama

by Brad Haseman & Peter O’Toole

 

The international best seller is back, bigger and better than ever. This revised edition brings the contents completely up to date with the new Arts Curriculum.

Dramawise Reimagined specifically addresses ‘The Elements of Drama’, the first component of essential knowledge for Drama in the Australian Curriculum: The Arts.

Thirty years ago the authors first showed that all dramas are made up of the same elements and set them out in a clear pedagogic order where they could be explored and learned through dramatic action. The new book revisits and expands upon those elements, reframes them for twenty-first century education, and reimagines them for teachers and students.


Published February 2017

Transforming Schools
Creativity, Critical Reflection, Communication, Collaboration

by Miranda Jefferson & Michael Anderson

 

Transforming Schools demonstrates how transformation is no longer an option in teaching and learning - it has become a necessity. Changes in the way we work and the challenges of issues such as climate change, poverty and migration mean that teaching and learning need to alter to incorporate capacities that will help us meet those challenges. The 4Cs: Creativity, Critical Reflection, Communication and Collaboration have long been present in education, but Transforming Schools demonstrates how schools can change teaching and leadership to embed and enact the 4Cs to make them central to dynamic and exciting learning.

Miranda Jefferson and Michael Anderson demonstrate how a renewed approach to teaching that integrates the 4Cs can better equip today's learners. They draw on their own international research and experiences in school transformation in a variety of school settings, working in partnership with practitioners, researchers, students and the community. The authors consider how schools might reorganise themselves to become more relevant to their students and to the community.

Practical strategies for transformation are included throughout the chapters to demonstrate how learning can be supported and how the 4Cs can be made explicit in schools. These examples will support school leadership teams and teachers to explicitly teach the 4Cs in relevant and challenging ways. This book is essential reading for those looking to transform schools and more effectively meet the needs of today's learners. 


Australian Plays

Australian Plays

Brief Synopses

  • Parasites by Ninna Tersman is a coming of age story told from the point of view of teenage refugees.
  • Lake Disappointment by Lachlan Philpott & Luke Mullins is an unusual new work about ego, self-fashioning, and illusions.
  • Cold Light by Alana Valentine is an epic story that surveys the transformation of Australia from the post-WWII Menzies era to the mid-1970’s Whitlam government and asks timely questions about Australia’s relationship to women of vision and people of difference. (Large cast)
  • As told by the boys who fed me apples by Rosemary Johns is the poignant and fragmented war story of Sandy the only Australian War Horse to return home from World War I: through Sandy we experience the lives of three men who fought in the war.
  • Melbourne Talam by Rashma N Kalsie is inspired by real-life events, and puts Melbourne’s contemporary social issues at centre stage.
  • Michael Swordfish by Lachlan Philpott is the exciting product of collaboration with students that traverses the tumultuous landscape of the teenage experience with a sober truth and darkly comic voice. (Large cast - all male)
  • The Yellow Wave is an adaptation of Kenneth Mackay’s 19th century classic Australian novel by Jane Miller that explores immigration, gender, racial stereotyping, equality and notions of what is ‘other’ or ‘alien’. (Large cast)
  • Smurf in Wanderland by David Williams is one man’s insightful and hilarious examination of football, tribalism, belonging and identity.

Published April 2017

Parasites

by Ninna Tersman

 

Forced to flee their homelands with their persecuted parents, Isa and Leo are seeking asylum. Marooned in an immigration processing centre playing with dirty toys and facing hostile strangers while their parents undergo endless questioning, Isa and Leo pass the time by burlesquing the adults in their life — a sorry collection of bored bureaucrats, cloying aid workers, and defeated parents immobilized by despair.

A coming of age story told from the point of view of teenage refugees, Parasites is a poetic and sparsely written play that movingly depicts the predicament of two teenagers forced to deal with the complex issues of immigration and lost hope in a new country.

  • Cast : 1F, 1M

Published March 2017

Lake Disappointment

by Lachlan Philpott & Luke Mullins

 

Kane and I were both rising stars. I was rising to the top of the hand-modelling world and Kane was doing his plays. Kane got his first action film and I became his double. We clicked. Everyone said so.

Kane is one of the world’s biggest movie stars. His body double has been there from the start, sharing more than just looks with his famous counterpart. The body double and Kane are to work on Lake Disappointment - an independent arts film that might see them win prestigious awards and fame.

This one-person play of mirrors and mannerisms explores the strange world of the body double. It makes unique contributions to timeless theatrical concepts of images and representation. Lake Disappointment is an unusual new work about ego, self-fashioning, and illusions.

  • Cast : 1M

Published March 2017

Cold Light

by Alana Valentine

 

An epic story of national significance, Cold Light surveys the transformation of Australia from the post-WWII Menzies era to the mid-1970’s Whitlam government and asks timely questions about Australia’s relationship to women of vision and people of difference.

Delicious drama, involving life choices, and a celebration of the beauty of a life lived with passion and determination.

  • Cast : 4F, 19M, doubling possible

Published March 2017

As Told by the Boys Who Fed Me Apples

by Rosemary Johns

 

Sandy was the only Australian War Horse to return home from World War I. This is his poignant and fragmented war story. Through Sandy we experience the lives of three men who fought in the war.

  • Cast : 4M, doubling possible

Published April 2017

Melbourne Talam

by Rashma N Kalsie

 

Melbourne Talam tells the story of three Indian characters on three different types of visas—spouse, student and work—as they search for belonging in a foreign city.

A train accident disrupts each character’s ‘talam’—a Tamil term used in music, it is the base on which the notes of musical compositions and poetry rest—redirecting the lives of all three. The characters face adversity in many forms, both external and internal, and the conflict between their aspirations and the reality of the migrant experience drives the play’s drama.

Inspired by real-life events, Melbourne Talam puts Melbourne’s contemporary social issues at centre stage.

  • Cast : 1M, 2F

Publication due May 2017

Michael Swordfish

by Lachlan Philpott

 

What would happen if someone you knew disappeared? How would you react? How would your school react? An assembly called, a footy game postponed, a class interrupted. But who is Michael Swordfish? And who knows where he’s gone?

For two years award-winning playwright Lachlan Philpott collaborated with students from Newington College, Sydney, to bring their voices and worlds to life. Michael Swordfish is the exciting product of this collaboration: a play that traverses the tumultuous landscape of the teenage experience with a sober truth and darkly comic voice.

  • Cast : 9M

Published April 2017

The Yellow Wave

by Jane Miller

 

Kenneth Mackay’s 19th century classic Australian novel comes to vivid life on the stage, in an epic saga of love, heroism and sacrifice. The Yellow Wave is a prescient tale of war, passion and boat arrivals.

Soldier of fortune Philip Orloff and salt-of-the-earth Dick Hatten vie for the hand of stoic heroine Heather Cameron against a backdrop of invasion by a pair of Russian rail barons leading a Mongol force into the heart of Queensland.

Armed with sharp humour, this play explores immigration, gender, racial stereotyping, equality and notions of what is ‘other’ or ‘alien’. The Yellow Wave is an invasion like no other.

  • Cast : 4F, 19M, doubling possible

Publication due May 2017

Smurf in Wanderland

by David Williams

 

David Williams – acclaimed documentary theatre maker, writer and football fanatic – is the ‘Smurf’. For the uninitiated, ‘Smurf’ is the nickname given to a Sydney Football Club fan.

During the 2013-14 A League football season, Williams, a long-suffering Sydney FC fan, frequented Western Sydney Wanderers’ games on their home turf in Parramatta. Kitted out in his Sydney FC sky-blue jersey, Williams-the-Smurf stuck out like a sore thumb amongst the sea of red and black.

His presence caused bewilderment and banter, but none of the hooliganism that’s come to be associated with the game – he didn’t need to fear for his life.

Developed during Williams’ 2015 residency, Smurf in Wanderland is one man’s insightful and hilarious examination of football, tribalism, belonging and identity. It’s also a passionate defence of the fan – what it means to be a fan, the demonisation of fans and the artificial wedge that has been created between Sydney and its western suburbs.

  • Cast : 1M

International Plays

World Plays

Brief Synopses

  • Umlaut The Coarse Acting Hamlet by Michael Green imagines a hapless and incompetent theatre company attempting a condensed version of Hamlet.
  • NT Connections 2017 Twelve plays by twelve playwrights – each play has been specifically commissioned by the National Theatre's literary department with the young performer in mind.
  • The Crocodile by Tom Basden based on Dostoyevsky's short story is a ferociously funny, eye-poppingly theatrical play about art, animals and what happens when you try to take on the system from within...a crocodile.
  • Escape the Scaffold by Titas Halder is a dark and dangerous psychological thriller set against the background of a rapidly changing world.
  • The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence by Madeleine George is a brilliantly witty, time-jumping, loving tribute (and cautionary tale) dedicated to the people - and machines - upon which we all depend.
  • The Hypocrite by Richard Bean is a riotous new comedy.
  • Darknet by Rose Lewenstein navigates through the world of data commodification and the uncharted deep web, shining a light on the things we choose to share online and the places we can hide.
  • Girl in the Machine by Stef Smith is a disturbing but compassionate vision of our potential digital future, and what it might mean for 'life' as we know it.
  • Natives by Glenn Walron is a rallying cry to a generation of unlikely heroes, and celebrates coming of age online in a chaotic world.

Published February 2012

Umlaut, Prince of Dusseldorf
The Coarse Acting Hamlet

by Michael Green

 

The latest in Michael Green's hilarious Coarse Acting series, Umlaut, Prince of Dusseldorf imagines a hapless and incompetent theatre company attempting a condensed version of Hamlet. Cue bungled lines, an over-eager smoke machine operator and a severely injured Cup-Bearer. The ghost is determined to ruin all of Umlaut's best speeches while Hildegard, the Coarse Acting version of Ophelia, keeps forgetting that she's supposed to be dead. Cast and crew battle on regardless - surely the audience won't have noticed a thing?


Publication due May 2017

National Theatre Connections 2017

Twelve plays by twelve playwrights

 

Drawing together the work of 10 leading playwrights, this National Theatre Connections anthology features work by some of the most exciting and established contemporary playwrights. Gathered together in one volume, the plays collected offer young performers between the ages of 13 and 19 an engaging selection of material to perform, read or study.

Each play has been specifically commissioned by the National Theatre's literary department with the young performer in mind. The anthology contains 10 play scripts; notes from the writer and director of each play, addressing the themes and ideas behind the play; and production notes and exercises for the drama groups.


Published July 2015

The Crocodile

by Tom Basden

 

Ivan is a struggling actor who hasn't yet achieved the recognition he feels he deserves. But all that is about to change when, one afternoon at the zoo with his friend Zack, he is swallowed whole by a crocodile. Based on Dostoyevsky's short story, The Crocodile is a ferociously funny, eye-poppingly theatrical play about art, animals and what happens when you try to take on the system from within...a crocodile. It premiered as part of the 2015 Manchester International Festival, in a co-production with The Invisible Dot.


Published March 2017

Escape the Scaffold

by Titas Halder

 

Escape the Scaffold is a dark and dangerous psychological thriller set against the background of a rapidly changing world. Three best friends hunker down in their student house, forced to make decisions that will mark them for the rest of their lives. Get a job. Get married. Put down the tequila and take the money. Save yourself. Love triangle turns to murderous betrayal. Youthful idealism is tested, paranoia takes hold, and real life melts into a nightmare world. The basement is filling with water and there is a monster in the house.


Published June 2014

The (Curious Case of The) Watson Intelligence

by Madeleine George

 

FINALIST! Pulitzer Prize for Drama - 2014

Watson: trusty sidekick to Sherlock Holmes; loyal engineer who built Bell's first telephone; unstoppable super-computer that became reigning Jeopardy! champ; amiable techno-dweeb who, in the present day, is just looking for love.

These four constant companions become one in this brilliantly witty, time-jumping, loving tribute (and cautionary tale) dedicated to the people - and machines - upon which we all depend.

  • Cast: 2m, 1f

Published February 2017

The Hypocrite

by Richard Bean

 

April 1642. Sir John Hotham, Governor of Hull, Member for Beverley and owner of most of East Yorkshire is charged by Parliament to secure the arsenal at Hull and deny entry to King Charles I.

If only it were that simple. With a Royalist siege outside the city walls and the rebellion of the mob within, Civil War seems inevitable and losing his head more than probable. And that's to say nothing of his problems at home — a lovesick daughter, a ghost obsessed with the chinaware, sexually amusing fumiture and a wife intent on escape.

We join Sir John on the worst day of his life, as he is caught between two choices: Honour or Advantage.


Published April 2016

Darknet

by Rose Lewenstein

 

You're not even a fully formed person yet. Your face is still changing and your bones are still growing but already there's a detailed map of your personality out there and companies you've never heard of are getting rich off it.'

Welcome to Octopus Inc., the internet giant that allows users to exchange personal data for currency. But not everyone is prepared to sacrifice their privacy for an easier life.

A teenager subverts the system in an attempt to save her mother. A visionary tech exec takes shortcuts to get ahead. And a cybercriminal makes a choice between two kinds of freedom.

Darknet navigates through the world of data commodification and the uncharted deep web, shining a light on the things we choose to share online and the places we can hide. It was commissioned and produced by Potential Difference and premiered at Southwark Playhouse, London, in 2016.


Published March 2017

Girl in the Machine

by Stef Smith

 

'Do you want to live forever?
YES or NO.'

Polly and Owen have nailed it. Successful in their careers and wildly in love with each other, they feel ready to take on the world.

But when a mysterious new technology, promising a break from the daily grind, creeps into everyone's phones, their world is turned upside down. As the line between physical and digital rapidly dissipates, Polly and Owen are forced to question whether their definitions of reality and freedom are the same.

Girl in the Machine is a disturbing but compassionate vision of our potential digital future, and what it might mean for 'life' as we know it. The play premiered at the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, in 2017, directed by Traverse Artistic Director Orla O'Loughlin.


Published March 2017

Natives

by Glenn Walron

 

Where are the grown-ups to do something, where are the grown-ups in this story?'

Three countries. Three teenagers. One average, life-altering day.

A young man battles with feelings of love and violence. Another is stuck with the image of someone being pushed from a rooftop. And a girl must choose between her friends and her conscience.

Natives is a rallying cry to a generation of unlikely heroes, and celebrates coming of age online in a chaotic world. It premiered at Southwark Playhouse in March 2017, produced by Boundless Theatre and directed by Rob Drummer.


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